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Re: Wondering





----------
> From: James K. Glindemann <jglind@netspace.net.au>
> To: Rich & Lisa Maurer <rlmaurer@swconnect.net>
> Subject: Re: Wondering
> Date: Friday, April 10, 1998 9:56 PM
> 
> 
> 
> ----------
> > From: Rich & Lisa Maurer <rlmaurer@swconnect.net>
> > To: Simon Aegerter <aegerter@dataway.ch>; reflector@awpi.com
> > Subject: Re: Wondering
> > Date: Friday, April 10, 1998 2:56 PM
> > 
> > Simon,
> > 
> > I don't know anything about the Swiss Air Force, but my experience with
> the
> > American Air Force is that we always err to the safe, conservative side
> > when it comes to hazardous materials.  Or, it could be that there was
> some
> > concern about hazardous dust in the air, and rather than go out and
> > purchase dust masks, the on scene commander decided to use their
"issue"
> > gas masks.  One other possbility -- I know F-16s use hydrazine which is
> > highly toxic, and it's possible that F-18s use some sort of similarly
> toxic
> > materials.  The press could have easily gotten the facts a little off
if
> > the Swiss press is anything like we have in the states.  
> > 
> > As for the carbon fibers, I'm guessing that the B-1 has more carbon in
it
> > than an F-18 (our tails are made of carbon and are almost the size of
an
> > F-18), and I personally know several individuals who've participated in
> > recent B-1 on-scene accident investigations (we've had 2 in the last
> year),
> > and they did not wear respiratory protection.
> > 
> > Hope this answers your question.
> > 
> > Rich Maurer
> > 
> > ----------
> > > Builders:
> > > 
> > > The other day a FA-18 of the Swiss Air Force crashed into a mountain
> site
> > > scattering little pieces of plane and crew over a 1 km2 (0.5 sqmile)
> area.
> > > 
> > > The Swiss TY showed the recovery people sifting through snow and
grass
> > > looking for pieces. They all wore gas masks! The commentator said
this
> is
> > > to protect their respiratory system from pieces of carbon fiber that
> may
> > be
> > > laying around from shattered composite parts. They even showed a
> "victim"
> > > in a hospital where he had been brought for observation after he had
> > > strayed into the crash area without wearing  protection.
> > > 
> > > I know carbon dust is more dangerous than glass. But is it THAT bad?
> > > 
> > > Best
> > > Simon
> > > 
> > > Simon Aegerter, Winterthur, Switzerland
> > > 
> > > 
> > > 
> > 
> > 
> this info may not be exactly relevent to the thread but is interesting
just
> the same. On the safety notice board at work ( I work on helicopters for
a
> large US oil co.) there was a caution regarding a by product of the
burning
> of certain types of rubber, an acid ( the name of which escapes me )
common
> at crash sites.This acid on contact can cause injuries sometimes
requiring
> amputation of limbs to control. If any one would like more info I will
try
> and find it next time I am at work.
> 
> regards 
> Jim Glindemann
>